Sarah Anstett

Sarah Anstett

Sarah is a writer, researcher, and development practitioner currently based in Toronto, Canada.

Local Entrepreneur Brings Clean, Sustainable Fuel to Uganda

Over-dependence on wood for fuel is one of the leading causes of deforestation and desertification across Africa. Over 4 million hectares of forest are depleted each year, which is double the global average. According to the FAO, roughly 575 million people (between 75 – 80% of Africans) rely on wood fuel for household light and cooking. Aside from the rapid …

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Young Entrepreneur Develops Waterless Bath Product

Globally, over 2.5 billion people lack consistent access to clean water. Of those with intermittent access, their supplies are routinely interrupted by drought, weak economies, broken piping, and conflict, among other issues. When water is such a precious resource, how to make use of it can be a life or death decision. Most prioritize nutrition – either for direct consumption …

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Investing in Fair Trade Cotton opens Markets for Ugandan Farmers

In recent years, there has been an increase in public-private partnerships in development, particularly in facilitating access to markets for subsistence farmers and business enterprises. Micro-finance initiatives often seek to inject cash into local economies by financing small businesses in developing countries. These ventures can be successful in gradually increasing market access for the rural poor. A step up from …

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More Crop per Drop: India’s Micro-Nutrient Solution

Rain-fed agriculture accounts for over 80% of the world’s farm area and generates about 60% of the world’s staple food supply. It also supports the livelihoods of about 80% of the world’s population. Related to this, 95% of the world’s poor live in the Global South and the bulk of those people rely on subsistence agriculture for survival. Climate change …

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Seaweed Biofuel Promotes Island Self-Sustainability

Biofuel hold promise for some, but is a bad word to others. While reducing dependency on fossil fuels, many are produced from food crops like corn or sugar, meaning food meant for hungry mouths is diverted to filling gas tanks. To heighten production, farmers begin mono-cropping, which degrades the soil. The amount of fresh water required, and the carbon emissions …

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Nothing to Shake a Stick At: MIT Introduces Tree-Based Water Filters

  The UN estimates that 85% of the world’s population lives in the driest half of the planet. 783 million people don’t have access to clean water, and roughly 2.5 billion people don’t have access to sanitation. Various systems have been developed using charcoal, sand or chlorination to filter impurities and contaminants. Some are costly, some are complicated, some require …

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A Unique DIY Hospital in Rural Nigeria

  Over recent years there has been an influx of high-tech innovations geared toward poverty reduction in a variety of ways. It is important to remember that our concept of the digital age is unreachable for many in the Global South and not all innovations require the use of ‘modern technology’. While it is making strides in a variety of …

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Mobile Rapid Diagnostic Testing: Helping Farmers Protect Crops, People in East Africa

Farming in the Global South has always been a delicate task. A lack of modern farming tools and methods and a susceptibility to floods or droughts makes farming a precarious task that often results in low crop yields. Crops can fall victim to poison-inducing fungi which, when untreated, can cause severe illness in those who consume them. One of the …

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Time-Share Schooling brings Refugee Children back into the Classroom

The Syrian crisis has led to an outpouring of more than 2.3 million people into other countries in the region. Of that, an estimated 865,000 are children, and 70 – 80% are not enrolled in school. It is a harrowing concern, and a UK-based organization has taken the lead on bringing kids back into the classroom. Host countries like Lebanon …

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Making Vaccines Less Temperature Sensitive

Reports recently released by the WHO, and covered in the laudable journal Vaccine, credit breaking the cold chain for drastically reducing rates of Meningitis A across the Sub-Saharan African Meningitis Belt. MenAfriVac is the first Controlled – Temperature – Chain (CTC) vaccine to be administered in Africa. It was produced by the Meningitis Vaccination Project, which is a joint initiative …

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