Conservation Continues in Paraguay’s Biodiversity Hotspot

Since winning the Rolex Enterprise Award in 2012, Karina Atkinson and her organization, Para La Tierra (PLT), have received much positive attention for their conservation efforts in Paraguay’s exceptionally diverse, and increasingly threatened natural environment— an area known as “South America’s forgotten corner.”

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Traditions and Technology Combat Illegal Logging

  Indigenous groups in Northern Brazil are taking matters into their own hands to protect the Amazon Rainforest. Areas close to the Ka’apor’s indigenous territory, within the Alto Turiaçu region, have been targeted by illegal loggers. The roughly 2,000 person tribe is now embracing new innovations to combat rapid deforestation near their homes. These groups of “forest guardians,” as they refer …

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How Coastal Mapping and Conservation Can Save Lives

The world’s 15 most at-risk nations for natural hazards are all coastal, tropical, and developing countries. NGOs and governments are spending billions of dollars to construct sea walls, levees, and other barriers to protect against risk. But unlike natural barriers, artificial ones can be easily destroyed by a single extreme weather event. SNAP is exploring how restoring coastal habitats can protect coastal communities and livelihoods, and reduce fatalities and loss of property.

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Virtual Watch Room Monitors the World’s Largest Marine Reserve

In March of this year, the United Kingdom officially announced the creation of the largest marine reserve in the world. Covering 834,334 square-kilometers (roughly 3.5 times larger than the U.K. itself), it protects the waters around the Pitcairn Islands, which are home to over 1,200 different species. While marine reserves aren’t a new idea, this one changes the game by using satellite technology to monitor the area in real time.

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Marine conservation in an octopus’ garden

Blue Ventures strives to work with coastal communities to improve and sustain marine conservation. By getting locals involved, they not only feel empowered, but become actively involved in a project that directly benefits them, indirectly benefits marine life as a whole, and ensures sustainability.

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Celebrating 365 days of zero poaching

The tragedy in Nepal has been devastating, and the road to recovery will be long. Through this, it is important to share some of the country’s many successes. As a country that many endangered species call home, Nepal has officially declared a second full 365-day cycle of zero poaching. From February 2013 to February 2014, not a single elephant, rhino or tiger was illegally killed. In 2011 they also officially declared that not a single rhino was illegally killed. This is a huge accomplishment, as the country boasts many animals that are commonly hunted, and illegally killed, for horns, tusks and pelts that sell for large sums in Asian markets.

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Beekeeping and Global Development

  Bees have been domesticated for thousands of years in one fashion or other. Their honey provides us with a bounty of nutrients and sugars that are hard to find in such abundance elsewhere in nature. Their service as pollinators is one of the most beneficial contributions that any species makes to the survival of the human race. These assets …

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Can Drones Stop Poaching?

While conservation areas and governments employ rangers to monitor and care for wildlife populations, too often the presence of poachers is discovered after the fact. In many areas, out of date technologies such as tracking collars, are used and yield little success. For years, rangers have needed new, innovative ways to track the activities within parks, and ensure the safety and protection of endangered wildlife

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Saving Habitat and Changing Attitudes in Paraguay

When Scottish biologist Karina Atkinson first arrived in Paraguay to take part in a volunteer program, she was not happy. That feeling didn’t last long however, as she made friends with local people. Her discovery of an artesian lake, Laguna Blanca, sealed her fate and in 2010 the 28-year-old scientist co-founded Para La Tierra, an NGO dedicated to the conservation of Reserva Natural Laguna Blanca.

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