Banana Fibre Pads Tackle Menstruation Taboo in East Africa

In Kenya, two Bachelor of Education students from Kabarak University have come up with a simple, locally-developed idea that has the power to change women’s lives. Ivy Etemesi and Paul Ntikoisa created Photo3a sanitary pad made out of fibres from banana trees. The pad is created by isolating the soft inner stems of the banana tree, washing them to remove impurities, and softening them into a fine fibre.

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Grain Tools Help Women in Senegal Thrive

In sub-Saharan Africa, 20% of the annual grain harvest is lost due in part to ancient processing methods. Women and girls often spend several hours each day threshing millet with a mortar and pestle and then wind winnowing to separate the grain from the chaff. Compatible Technology International developed three a suite of three tools that capture 90% of the grain.

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Reinventing the Wheel: India’s New Water Collection Device

  In the state of Rajasthan in northwestern India, women spend an average of six hours per day collecting water. This statistic is mirrored in countries throughout the Global South where women and girls disproportionately bear the time and physical constraints of water collection. In response, U.S. social venture Wello has developed a device known as the WaterWheel. The WaterWheel …

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Using Feminine Hygiene Products To Empower Victims of Human Trafficking

A group of University of Washington graduate students have developed a discreet way to get information to female victims of trafficking. Through a project called Pivot, they are hiding inserts with rescue information and a hotline number in plainly packaged sanitary napkins. The team of five students from the University of Washington including Michael Fretto, Kari Gaynor, Josh Nelson, Adriel …

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Malala Yousafzai and Vodafone’s Innovative Mobile Literacy Program

After recovering from the being shot by members of the Taliban while campaigning for women’s right to education in rural Pakistan, Malala Yousafzai is ready to launch a partnership with the Vodafone Foundation to help bring literacy to women in developing countries through mobile technology. Although Yousafzai is only 16, the teen has already written a book (I am Malala: The …

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