Quake Survivors Utilizing Open-Source Technology in Nepal

In the three weeks since Nepal’s Kathmandu valley region was rocked by a 7.8 magnitude earthquake, UNOCHA – who does what where and when have been tasked with search and rescue, and the provision food, health and shelter for thousands of people. The quake affected 3 districts, 5 municipalities, over 130 wards. Many of these communities are situated in remote and inaccessible regions have been the last to receive aid. In a local effort to bring relief to these communities more quickly, a local organization, backed by a US organization is utilizing open map technology to make visible remote communities, open spaces for logistical operations to set up, and to highlight any and all areas that might hinder or help the relief effort.

Continue reading

Disaster Preparedness Moves to Orbit

Training communities on protocols and running drills ensures that susceptible populations understand how to behave during natural disasters, but the unpredictable nature of these events means that we often cannot anticipate exactly how they will manifest. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been making advances to try to close our knowledge gap through the launch of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-2)

Continue reading

Bringing messages of hope, help and change over mobile devices – Part 1

In part one of our series on technology in humanitarian work, we profile two organizations that use cellphone technology to communicate aid initiatives, education programs, research surveys and more. Today, learn how Text to Change (TTC) is changing lives.

Continue reading

Print Your Own House

Fast, affordable, durable, and livable shelters are an essential part of emergency relief and the often protracted transition to stable housing in the years following a disaster. Traditional construction methods are often slow, expensive, inefficient, and dangerous, the combination of which creates roadblocks in community-based building projects, particularly in low-income areas. Now a group of engineers is using emerging 3D …

Continue reading